Forward Head Posture

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How often do you find yourself leaning forward when you’re sitting at a desk, typing on the computer or reading a book? Now ask yourself how often you feel stress and tension, or even get headaches, at the base of your neck? The further forward you stretch your head and neck, the more stress you place on it; this is called forward head posture.

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In normal posture, your head should be held back enough that your ears align with your shoulders. When you stretch past that point, so that your ears are in front of your shoulders, it can cause a multitude of problems: headaches, jaw pain, upper back pain, and over time, a hump where the cervical and thoracic vertebrae meet. For every inch out of alignment, an extra ten pounds of weight is added to the muscles and vertebrae in your neck. That means that even if you’re leaning forward by two inches, you’re adding twenty pounds of stress on your body! You’re forcing your muscles and ligaments to work harder to keep everything in alignment, so it’s no wonder that long-term forward posture can cause so many issues.

Forward head posture is a common problem we see in the office, but the good news is that there can be some correction if it’s caught in time! When Doctor Becerra recommends a course of treatment, he will often include therapies like the posture pump or resistance bands. The posture pump, which you can see in the picture below, helps correct the curve in the neck so that it naturally remains in the proper position.

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Whereas the posture pump works on the spinal structure, the neck resistance bands help strengthen the muscles so that it can hold the correction made in the vertebrae. Without strong muscles, it’s easy to return to leaning forward and putting stress on your neck again.

If you find yourself leaning forward too much and having headaches and neck pain, there’s a good chance that it’s still correctable! Call the office to schedule an appointment and talk to Doctor Becerra about correction.

Read more here: Forward Head Posture

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