Remodeling and Scar Tissue

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The final phase of healing is the remodeling phase.  This phase takes up to 12 months.  During this phase, the irregular pattern of scar tissues will line up in the proper direction to create a better quality of healing.  Therefore, remodeling is a motion-dependent phase, that governs the quality of healing in the tissues.  Scar tissues are more pain sensitive than the original tissues.  There are two reasons for this increase in sensitivity.  The first reason is there are more nerves found in scar tissue than in normal tissue making them more sensitive to pain.  The second reason is these nerves are not completely healthy.  They are more sensitive to the normal chemicals that make our nerves work.  This is similar to a car alarm system that is set too sensitively, so that someone lightly brushing against the car causes the alarm to sound.  The same scenario happens to people with this condition when normal activities cause them to have pain.  These nerves have been found to be up to one thousand times more sensitive than normal nerves.  People with this condition are able to predict weather changes because they can detect the small changes in the barometric pressure of the atmosphere.  These types of scar tissues are less elastic or stiffer than the original tissues.  These new scar tissues are so poorly aligned that when they are stressed the fibers do not move the way they should.  In addition, these scar tissues tend to become “glued” together.  Because of the poor alignment and the gluing together, the scar tissues become stiffer, weaker and less resilient.  These scar tissues are deficient in the criss-cross pattern that makes the tissues strong.  This is similar to the criss cross pattern on of cloth.  IF cloth were made in a haphazard pattern, our clothing would be unable to hold up to daily wear and tear.  The same is true in the scar tissues of the body.  This means there is less a person can do before they experience a flare-up of pain and spasm.

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