Three Phases of Healing-Part 2

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You know,  so often people come into the office and have no idea that they have an injury.  When we say the word injury we think of a major injury like a sprained ankle or torn knee ligament or a broken bone.  But mostly, I see people who are doing everyday things, like working out or carrying their infant or even taking out the garbage.  Things that we have done a hundred times before can all of a sudden cause a problem.  Why does that happen?  Well, mostly it’s muscle weakness.  Our bodies become weaker as we get older, if we don’t make a conscious effort to keep in shape.  Also, stress plays a large part in injuries.  It’s helpful to know the three phases of healing.  We’ve already covered the first one, and so now on to the second of the three phases.

REGENERATION (two of three)
The second of the three  phases of healing,  is called regeneration, begins about three days after an injury.  During this phase of healing, the tears in the tissues begin to accumulate small protein cells called collagen.  These cells create a glue that fills the gap in the tissues caused by the tear.  This laying down of the collagen glue during the regeneration phase will take six to eight weeks to complete.  After this phase no more glue will be laid down.  The flue is what will become scar tissue.  When the glue is making scar tissue in the injured area it is being laid down in a weaker more irregular pattern and not in the stronger, criss-cross consistent pattern.  After all the glue is in place and the scar tissue has been formed, the healing process is still not yet complete.  Ligaments, muscles and tendons can literally take months for the body to fully repair, unlike bone, that can heal in six to eight weeks.

taken from: Chiromania “Three Phases of Healing”

 

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