Knees and Hips and Weight Loss

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The major joints of your body which support the most weight, are your knees and hips.  It’s foolish to assume that if you’re overweight, that your joints won’t suffer for it.  Over years, the pressure placed on your knees and hips from too much body weight, can result in the break down of cartilage and soft tissue in the knees and hips.  This, coupled with a sedentary life style, can mean doom and gloom for your joints, which can result in the need for a knee or hip replacement.  A knee and hip replacement is needed when the surfaces of the bones are worn due to arthritis, being over weight, a congenital defect or even over activity.  If you are anything like Olympic athlete Mary Lou Retton, had a total hip replacement due to her dysplasia as well as from years of gymnastics.

So what can be done?  Some real practical steps you can take to leading a healthy joint life style, basic, and but to some it can sound over whelming: Daily exercise-this will help keep arthritis (inflammation of the joints) at bay (consult your doctor before starting any exercise program), losing weight-this can seem overwhelming, but honestly, we can all do it!  We need to start slow, take a walk every morning, starting at a half a mile.  Then go from there.  We have the power to decrease portions, stick with proteins and fruits and veggies, and remember, to consult your doctor before starting any diet program.  Here’s an interesting fact:  For every pound you lose, three pounds of pressure will be removed from your knees and six pounds of pressure will be removed from your hips.  If you think of it that way, losing a pound or two, isn’t all that hard!  Pick one thing to start on, perhaps it’s going to be eliminating ice cream or cup cakes from your diet.  Start slow.

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